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in washington, d.c., or in wichita, or san francisco is effectively working shoulder to shoulder with a computer user in beijing or moscow. there is literally milliseconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. i thought i would point that out. as for the security, the reality is is almost remarkable how vulnerable computer systems are. cyberspace is not what most people think it is. most people equate cyberspace with the internet, but if they want to think clearly about what cyberspace is, it is important note it is a gps system on new cars, it is the iphone, the droids, it is jetfighters, jet planes, anything driven by computers -- excuse me, computer code, and linked to networks can be part of cyberspace. and the vulnerabilities are almost stunningly pervasive. >> can you give an example? >> sure, charlie miller, who is a former government hacker, who is now on the good side, a security specialist, one of the great hackers in the world, he last year decided to explore the vulnerabilities in the iphone. he found a vulnerability in the iphone that when he deployed it the right way, and
in washington, d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder to shoulder with a computer user in beijing or in moscow. there's literally no seconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i'd point that out. as for the security, the reality is that, um, it's almost remarkable how vulnerabl comp sysms are. and cyberspace, um, is not what most people think it is. most people now equate cyberspace with the bear net. -- internet. but if they want to think about what cyberspace is, it's the gps system on the new cars, it's the iphone and the droids, it's jet fighters and jet planes. anything that is driven by computers, excuse me, by computer code and is linked to networks, um, can be a part of cyberspace. and the vulnerabilities are, um, almo stunningly pervasive. >> host: can you ge an example? >> guest: well, sure. charlie miller, who is a former government hacker who worked on the good side is now a security potentialist, one of the great hackers in the world, a white hat hacker, he last year decided to explore vulnerabilities in the iphone, and he foun
project -- a side from its appellate his that are denied it -- >> at&t tried to introduce uverse in san francisco. it took them years to get the necessary approval. i mention that in particular because video is one area that has seen increased competition. you have this telecommunications provider trying to provide a video. municipalities and the government should do everything we can -- they can to reduce those barriers. >> david, when -- davdi cohen was not concerned about google being a fiber threat. do you think that is an issue that there is not enough capital? >> i cannot say whether there is enough capital, but i can say companies have told me they are sitting on billions of dollars on their balance sheet. they are going to be more hesitant to make those investments in fiber deployments or internet infrastructure. it is not worth taking the risk if -- >> it has been a priority to clear the red tape. is there something the fcc is not doing right? >> there are several things the commission could do. the first thing is what i mentioned earlier. making sure we do not expand or extend
-verse in the city of san francisco, and it took several years for them to get the approvals to roll out this video service. and i mention that in particular because video is one area where there has been a lot of talk about the need for increased competition. here you have a tradition call telecommunications provider trying to enter the marketplace to provide video, and in my view municipalities and state governments and the federal government should do everything it can to reduce those barriers to make sure we don't stand in the way of more competition. >> david cohen on his episode of "the communicators" said that he budget concerned about google fiber being a competitive threat because he doesn't think that google or anybody else simply has the money to be able to invest in it across the country. do you think that's a problem we're facing, that there isn't enough capital to make that investment? >> guest: um, from my vantage point i can't say whether or not there's enough capital. what i can say is many companies have told me that they are sitting on billions of dollars on their balance sheepts
. a computer user in washington d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder-to-shoulder with a computer worker in beijing or in moscow. there there is literally milliseconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i would point that out. as for the security, the reality is that it's almost remarkable how vulnerable computer systems are. cyberspace is not what most people think it is. most people now a quite cyberspace with the internet, but if they want to be clear about what cyberspace is i think it's important to note that it's the gps system on the new cars. it's the iphone and the droid. its jet fighters and jet planes. and anything anything that is driven by computers -- excuse me, by computer code and is linked to networks can be a part of cyberspace. the vulnerabilities are almost stunningly pervasive. >> host: can you give an example of? >> guest: well, sure. charlie miller charlie miller who is a former government hacker who worked on the good side is now a security specialist. the great hackers of the world. he last year decided
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)